• opinion

    Covid-19: Pandemic Pet Buying

    There’s been a noticeable rise in the number of people looking for a pet companion during the coronavirus. Some shelters are empty as more and more people are adopting pets. People have the time now since we’re all just stuck at home but what about when this all blows over? What happens when things eventually get back to normal? When people have to go back to work, back to their everyday routine before all of this started, what happens to the pet? Who’s going to look after the pet if you aren’t home? Will the pet be sent straight back to the shelter? Just because someone is bored or feeling…

  • history

    The Cromwellian conquest of Ireland

    About Cromwell Oliver Cromwell was a Huntingdon born English general and statesman. Cromwell was Chancellor of Oxford from 1650-57 and was also appointed Lord Protector of the British Isles from 1653 until 1658. The Cromwellian Conquest The first cannon was introduced to Ireland at the end of the 15th century.   Cromwell was a highly resilient member of parliament from 1640-1642. In the summer of 1649, he was sent to Ireland with two objectives: to place it firmly under English control and to superintend the confiscation the land of all ‘rebels’. In his book, The Cromwellian settlement of Ireland, John Patrick Prendergast summarised what happened next:  “As their object was…

  • opinion

    Stop the killing of rare species

    Yesterday, I was scrolling through my news feed when I came across an article stating that two extremely rare white giraffes (a mother and calf) had been killed by poachers in north-eastern Kenya. Until that point I have to admit, I had not heard of a white giraffe but after a quick internet search, I discovered that the reason these giraffes were white in colour is due to a condition called leucism – a partial loss of pigmentation in an animal, which makes them look so different to the regular giraffe we all know so well. I also discovered that because these two rare species were killed, unfortunately that leaves…

  • Uncategorized

    Key Things To Know About Fairtrade

    As Fairtrade Fortnight began just the other day, you may have seen various Fairtrade related posts online. If you would like to know exactly what Fairtrade is and what they do in simpler terms then read on. Here are some key things to know about Fairtrade… What exactly is Fairtrade?  Fair trade is a worldwide movement that aims to help farmers and producers in developing countries. The term fair trade means that the farmers and the producers receive a fair price for the goods that they produce. History of Fairtrade The Fairtrade Foundation was formed in 1992 by CAFOD, Christian Aid, Oxfam, Traidcraft, the World Development Movement and the National…

  • travel

    Seal Rescue Ireland

    On a recent trip, I stumbled across Seal Rescue Ireland, a national charity that rescues and rehabilitates sick, injured and orphaned seal pups and inspires ocean conservation. It’s located in Courtown, Co Wexford. According to the visitor signs displayed by the kennels, when a seal is first admitted to Seal Rescue Ireland, they are placed into an off display Intensive Care Unit. This is like the behind the scenes where staff carry out treatment on the seals. Once the pup is healthy enough for a larger space, they are moved into the kennels we the public can see. The kennels are furnished with rubber mats for comfort, a heating source…

  • Uncategorized

    Is change up ahead?

    Mark the date in your diaries! The Irish General Election will take place on Saturday 8th February 2020. It will be the first time the general election has taken place on a Saturday since 14th December 1918 – the formation of the first Dail. We need a new group of leaders to solve the various crises that have sprung out of control in the last nine years Fine Gael have been in power. It’s time for the government to step up. At the moment in Ireland, we have three considerable issues that need to be addressed: Homelessness, Hospital overcrowding (trolley crisis) and the housing crisis. As we enter a new…

  • history

    The Claddagh Ring – The story behind Ireland’s traditional jewellery piece

    Tradition Traditionally, the Claddagh ring was passed from mother to first daughter and was worn as a symbol of friendship and as a wedding ring. The distinctive design is associated with one of the Tribes of Galway, the Joyce family. The Claddagh Ring dates from the 17th century and originated in the little village of Claddagh in County Galway, Ireland. How the Claddagh ring was worn When it was worn with the heart nearest the finger nail on the right hand, it indicated that the wearer was single and suitors were open to consideration. Placed the same way on the left hand indicated that although the wearer was still single…

  • history

    A short biography: Seán Ó Faoláin

    Seán Ó Faoláin was an Irish short story writer, born in Cork city in 1900. He studied both here in University College Cork (UCC) and also in Harvard. He taught in England before returning to Ireland in 1933. In conjunction with his collection of short stories which Ó Faoláin is noted for, he also wrote biographies on famous Irish figures such as Theobald Wolfe Tone( The autobiography of Wolfe tone published in 1937) and Daniel 0’Connell( A life of Daniel O’Connell published a year later). In 1940, Seán Ó Faoláin founded The Bell, a monthly magazine featuring literature and social commentary. Peadar O’Donnell took over editorship six years after it…

  • Uncategorized

    The Cork Homeless

    Christmas may be the most wonderful time of year for many in Ireland but that isn’t the case for homeless people. While the majority of Ireland’s homeless live on the streets of Dublin, the amount of people presenting as homeless in Cork has significantly risen. The figures  In 2018, the number of adults presenting as homeless in Cork rose from 358 to 491. That’s an increase of 133 homeless people in the region. Figures released in February 2019 showed that there were exactly 9,987 people registered as homeless in Ireland. 514 of those individuals were in Cork City. In October of this year, 447 adults were in emergency accommodation in…